Transition to Teaching provides path to the classroom

By 

It was impatience – and the current news throughout the country – that led Grace Waltz to the Secondary Transition to Teaching program at the School of Education. She had a successful career as a video producer, but found herself wanting to do something more collaborative, more fulfilling and more interactive with the people inside and out of her community.

“I listened to stories of our country's peaking divisiveness and the potential for this polarization to start in our K-12 schools,” Waltz explained. “I thought about my love for kids and grammar, and I just jumped right in.”

Once she made her decision to go into education, Waltz chose the Transition to Teaching program: “What was amazing and unique was that after simply asking about my eligibility for the program, I received support and acceptance from all people in the School of Education. I was motivated to apply and begin the program.”

I listened to stories of our country's peaking divisiveness and the potential for this polarization to start in our K-12 schools. I thought about my love for kids and grammar, and I just jumped right in.

Grace Waltz
Grace Waltz in the classroom

Those who feel called to teach like Waltz who already have a bachelor’s degree in another field can complete the program in just three semesters. Most coursework is done online so students can continue to work and complete the program without moving to Bloomington.

Waltz is now a ninth- and tenth-grade English Language Arts Teacher at North Central High School in Indianapolis. While she acknowledges the societal discouragement toward becoming a teacher, her passion for social justice for students and love of her current job keeps her going.

“I am fortunate enough to be able-bodied, able-minded, financially independent, and truly inspired to teach and work with young people,” she said. “I'm lucky enough to do this thing that I have come to love.”