Joshua A Danish Profile Image
Joshua A Danish
Associate Professor
Faculty
W.W. Wright Education Building Room Wright Ed Bldg 4040
Phone : (812) 856-8330
Send me an e-mail
Department:  Counseling and Educational Psychology
Affiliations:  Learning Sciences , Center for Research on Learning and Technology
 
 

ABOUT ME

The overarching theme in my program of research is an examination of how people learn through activity. Learning through activity involves interacting with other people, physical objects, and ideas. Physical objects can range from actual flowers and drawings that label their parts to computer simulations. Similarly, ideas include individual beliefs and preferences, the rules that groups such as classrooms follow, and historically developed concepts that span generations. My research examines how individuals coordinate their actions and ideas within these complex settings, and how this can lead to learning.

A major focus of my work has been examining how young students (5-7 years old) create representations while learning about complex science concepts.

To unpack the process through which individual students engage in and learn through activity, my work is driven by empirical studies that examine:

  • The process through which students create and use material representational tools such as drawings, graphs, and computer simulations when they are learning new concepts.

    The process through which students create and use material representational tools such as drawings, graphs, and computer simulations when they are learning new concepts.
  • The reciprocal way in which individual students contribute their own ideas to complex activity systems and appropriate knowledge from those systems.

    The reciprocal way in which individual students contribute their own ideas to complex activity systems and appropriate knowledge from those systems.
  • The design of new activities and computational tools to support learning while also revealing theoretical and practical insights into how learning occurs.

    The design of new activities and computational tools to support learning while also revealing theoretical and practical insights into how learning occurs.

For additional information, please see my website at http://www.joshuadanish.com.



DEGREES

  • Ph.D. Psychological Studies in Education, 2009, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
  • M.A. Psychological Studies in Education, 2005, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
  • B. S. Computer Science, 1997, Johns Hopkins University, Baltmore, MD

AWARDS

  • Recipient of the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies
  • Best Design Paper Award at CSCL

SELECT PUBLICATIONS

  • Enyedy, N., Danish, J. A. (2015). Learning Physics through Play and Embodied Reflection in an mixed-reality learning environment. In V. Lee (Ed.), Learning Technologies and the Body: Integration and Implementation in Formal and Informal Learning Environments. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Danish, J. A., Enyedy, N. (2014). Latour Goes to Kindergarten: Children Marshalling Allies In a Spontaneous Argument About What Counts as Science. Language Culture and Social Interaction.
  • Danish, J. A.(2014). Applying An Activity Theory Lens to Designing Instruction For Learning About The Structure, Behavior, and Function of a Honeybee System. Journal of the Learning Sciences. 1-49.
  • Enyedy, N., Danish, J. A., DeLiema, D. (2015). Liminal Blends: How students blend symbols, experiences, and their own bodies together in order to co-construct meaning in a collaborative augmented-reality learning environment. International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning.
  • Peppler, K., Danish, J. A. (2013). E-textiles for Educators: Participatory Simulations with e-Puppetry In L. Buechley, K. Peppler, M. Eisenberg Y. Kafai (Eds.), Textile Messages: Dispatches from the World of E-textiles and Education.
  • Danish, J. A., Peppler, K., Phelps, D., Washington, D. (2011). Life in the Hive: Supporting Inquiry Into Complexity Within the Zone of Proximal Development. Journal of Science Education and Technology.
  • Enyedy, N., Danish, J. A., DeLiema, D. (2013). Constructing and Deconstructing Materially-Anchored Conceptual Blends in an Augmented Reality Collaborative Learning Environment (full paper). In S. Puntambekar, N. Rummel, M. Kapur M. Nathan (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. Madison, WI.
  • Danish, J. A., Enyedy, N., Parnafes, O. (2015). Socializing coordination class theory: the joint construction of public knowledge. In A. A. diSessa, M. Levin, N. J. S. Brown (Eds.), Knowledge and interaction: A synthetic agenda for the learning sciences. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Maltese, A. V., Danish, J. A., Bouldin, R. M., Harsh, J. A., Bryan, B. (2015). What are students doing during lecture" Evidence from new technologies to capture student activity. International Journal of Research Method in Education, 1-19. doi: 10.1080/1743727x.2015.1041492
  • Brown, N. J. S., Danish, J. A., Levin, M., diSessa, A. A. (2015). Competence Reconceived: The Shared Enterprise of Knowledge Analysis and Interaction Analysis. In A. A. diSessa, M. Levin, N. J. S. Brown (Eds.), Knowledge and interaction: A synthetic agenda for the learning sciences. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Danish, J. A., Enyedy, N., Parnafes, O. (2014). A Coordination Class in Interaction. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences. Boulder, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  • Enyedy, N., Danish, J. A. (2014). Distributed acts of reflection: Embodied acts to focus and filter a jointly produced reflection. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences. Boulder, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  • Enyedy, N., Danish, J. A., Fields, D. (2011). Negotiating the Relevant in Culturally Relevant Mathematics. Canadian Journal for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education 11(3).
  • Danish, J. A., Phelps, D. (2010). Kindergarten and First-Grade Students Representational Practices While Creating Storyboards of Honeybees Collecting Nectar. In K. Gomez, L. Lyons J. Radinsky (Eds.), Learning in the Disciplines: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2010) - Volume 1, Full Papers (pp. 420-427). Chicago IL: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  • Danish, J. A., Saleh, A. (2015). The impact of classroom context upon 1st and 2nd grade students critical criteria for science representations. Instructional Science. doi: 10.1007/s11251-015-9355-8
  • Enyedy, N., Danish, J. A. (2015). Learning Physics through Play and Embodied Reflection in an mixed-reality learning environment. In V. Lee (Ed.), Learning Technologies and the Body: Integration and Implementation in Formal and Informal Learning Environments. New York, NY.: Routledge.
  • Saleh, A., Danish, J., Enyedy, N., Lee, C. (2015). Assessing Young Childrens Cognition through Multi-Modal Interviews. In O. Lindwall, Hkkinen, P., Koschman, T. Tchounikine, P. Ludvigsen, S. (Ed.), Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: The Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference (Vol. 1). Gothenburg, Sweden: The International Society of the Learning Sciences.
  • Danish, J. A., Enyedy, N. (2007). Negotiated Representational Mediators: How Young Children Decide What to Include in Their Science Representations. Science Education, 91(1), 1-35.

GRANT FUNDING

  • DIP: Science through Technologically Enhanced Play (STEP)
  • Using the iPad to Support Representation in Graduate Seminars
  • DIP: BioSim: Developing a Wearable Toolkit for Teaching Complex Science Through Embodied Play
  • Representational Practices in Science and Language Arts: What?s the Difference and Why
  • EXP: Promoting Learning through Annotation of Embodiment (PLAE)
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